MEGASLOTH!

Apr 13
magictransistor:

Diane Arbus. Child with a Toy Hand Grenade in Central Park, N.Y.C. 1962.

SNFU.

magictransistor:

Diane Arbus. Child with a Toy Hand Grenade in Central Park, N.Y.C. 1962.

SNFU.

(via pulse-width)


The kid at work.

The kid at work.


Apr 12
theremina:

Vinyl and needle magnified X1000 
Via Microscopic Images.

theremina:

Vinyl and needle magnified X1000 

Via Microscopic Images.

(via raymondboisjoly)


youngrivers:

Sketch of a Druze elder, taken from a 1977 National Geographic. Ballpoint, 4” x 8.5”-ish.

youngrivers:

Sketch of a Druze elder, taken from a 1977 National Geographic. Ballpoint, 4” x 8.5”-ish.



towerofsleep:

ezrapoundinthetardis:

We’re like 20 min into the Jameson part of this and basically he is taking a dump on his audience (grad students) and like singing the praises of Lenin 

hoo boy

This is Starship Troopers type funny. 

(Source: layfloordoomall)


Apr 7

strange-fires:

oddpop:

the complete obscure records discography is available for streaming and download at the ever wonderful UbuWeb.

"Obscure Records was a U.K. record label which existed from 1975 to 1978. It was created and run by Brian Eno, who also produced the albums (credited as executive producer in one instance). Ten albums were issued in the series. Most have detailed liner notes on their back covers, analyzing the compositions and providing a biography of the composer, in a format typical of classical music albums, and much of the material can be regarded as 20th century classical music. The label provided a venue for experimental music, and its association with Eno gave increased public exposure to its composers and musicians."

PAVILION OF DREAMS

(via pulse-width)


Apr 6

tanacetum-vulgare:

that moment where you think you wanna do a creepy thing then you say “no, i don’t want to do this creepy thing” so you don’t

it’s a good moment.


Apr 5

markrichardson:

When I was a boy I’d hear “Take the ‘A’ Train” and dream about taking the “A” train; now I live in New York and I can actually do it. This is Charles Mingus’ mid-60s band doing the Billy Strayhorn tune, which was the signature of Duke Ellington’s band. Eric Dolphy plays with Mingus here. He takes the bass clarinet solo. What a pairing. Something amazing about watching these people standing so close to each other and making this incredible music with their bodies. Eric Dolphy died a few months after this was shot. He was 36. Shortly after, Mingus released a live album featuring this band, and it had only two tracks. One was called “So Long Eric” and the other was called “Praying With Eric”.

(via markrichardson)


Apr 4

Very convincing. 


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